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Neil Quisenberry

Professor of Sociology, Sociology at McKendree University
Chair of the Division of Social Science at McKendree University
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Chair of the Division of Social Science at McKendree University
September 2014 - Present
Professor of Sociology at McKendree University
August 2003 - Present
2018 Vita at McKendree University
August 2003 - Present
Texting and Driving: Can it be Explained by the General Theory of Crime?
AbstractThere has been quite a bit of media attention devoted recently to the topic of distracted driving generally, and texting and driving specifically. Recent studies by scholars, as well as the Department of Transportation, have continued to demonstrate the dangers of texting while driving. Previous studies have found that texting while driving reduces reaction and control times even more than drinking and driving. At least one study found that drivers who text are 23 times more likely to crash relative to non-distracted drivers. Tougher laws may be alluring as a deterrent to this behavior, but according to the data in this study, 96 % of respondents knew it was against the law but continued to text and drive anyway. This finding casts doubt on the effectiveness of any new distracted driving laws. The general theory of crime (Gottfredson & Hirschi, 1990) posits that levels of self-control are tied to deviant behaviors such as texting while driving. Other studies have also found that levels of self-control were significantly tied to other dangerous driving behaviors such as driving while drinking and driving without using a seatbelt. The findings in this study add support to the general theory of crime by demonstrating that, among college students in this sample, higher self-control significantly reduces the amount of texting while driving. Texting and Driving: Can it be Explained by the General Theory of Crime?. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271916700_Texting_and_Driving_Can_it_be_Explained_by_the_General_Theory_of_Crime [accessed May 23 2018].
Articles
Neil Quisenberry was recognized for earning an academic award
United Methodist Teaching Award
Fall 2013 - Added by Neil
Neil Quisenberry was recognized for earning an academic award
William Norman Grandy Outstanding Teaching Award
Spring 2010 - Added by Neil
Neil Quisenberry was recognized for earning an academic award
Martin Luther King Humanitarian Award
Spring 2009 - Added by Neil
Neil Quisenberry was recognized for earning an academic award
Sociology Departmental Teaching Award
Spring 2001 - Added by Neil
Vita
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